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Page 49. M. Ward, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, p. 97. Unspoken Sermons, series 3, p. 68. Chapter 9; pp. 66-67 of the 1962 edition. Tree and Ixaf, p. 53. Christian Reflections, pp. 132ff. ('The Language of Religion'). Compare what Tolkien says about adjectives and incantations in Tree and Leaf, p. 25. For a brief account of Lindsay, see the Appendix. A Dish of Orts, p. 27. Tree andljeaf, p. 54. " (M. Camus) "The act of being in love is still not in the deepest sense the Good. " (Kierkegaard) Any person setting out to write fantastic fiction with the intention of using it in the service of Christianity (or indeed of anything else) must obviously find some way of relating it to reality.

Much more common than allegory, in MacDonald and Williams at least, is what one can probably best call Personification (though in some cases this might be a little misleading) - the appearance in a story, most of whose characters are normal human beings, of one or more allegorical figures. ) Usually, there is only one such: a figure, like MacDonald's various wise women, or Williams's 'Necessities'. But in Judgement at Chelmsford Williams turns this kind of symbolizing inside out. The plot of the play, in so far as there is one, involves chiefly the personifications - the Accuser and the Sees, that is, Chelmsford herself and the Great Sees (Rome, Canterbury, Constantinople, Antioch and Jerusalem) who act as observers and commentators: the human characters only appear in brief episodes.

Perhaps some would feel (with or without saying it) that all art was to be condemned: the 'truly serious people' mentioned by Mrs. LeGuin in the quotation prefixed to this chapter, for instance. One of the Inklings, Adam Fox, even complained that the word 'escape' was being used "to condemn art, religion, and almost anything that's pleasant, including research"5. But this is unusual. The word 'sub-creation' raises another point of considerable importance. Both Tolkien and MacDonald take quite seriously the analogy between humans' imaginative 'creation' and the real Creation that is the work of God alone.

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